Southwark (4), London Location map
 
  View of the entrance to the George, London, England   Southwark.

The entrance to the George pub's courtyard is not easily missed and is in Borough High Street on the left-hand side going south just past the junction with St. Thomas Street. This was one of a number of coaching inns along this stretch of road.

 

 

 

 

 

Enlarge Comment  
 
  View of a Borough Market entrance, London, England   Southwark.

Opposite the George on the other side of Borough High Street is one of the entrances to Borough Market designed in the Art Deco style and added in 1932.

Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market. The retail part of the market is open to the public only on some days so check before you go.

 

 

Enlarge Comment More of Borough Market
 
  Photograph of the Old Operating Theatre and Shard, London, England   Southwark.

The brick tower on the left, in St. Thomas Street, is part of St. Thomas Church and houses the entrance to the Old Operating Theatre. The church used to be part of the old St. Thomas Hospital which has since been moved to a new site but is now used as a chapter house for Southwark Cathedral.

After the old hospital was moved the Old Operating Theatre was forgotten and lay undiscovered until 1957 and is the oldest Operating Theatre in Europe.

The high, modern, tower on the right is the Shard.

 

 

 

Enlarge Comment More of the Old Operating Theatre
 
  Photograph of the Anchor, London, England   Southwark.

The Anchor, at the end of Clink Street, is where Samuel Pepys took refuge from, and watched, the Great Fire of London in 1666. The current building was rebuilt in 1676 and has since had additions over the centuries. It is the sole survivor of the riverside inns that existed here in Shakespeare's time.

At that time the Anchor was frequented by actors from the nearby playhouses including the Globe and at a later date was a favourite place for river pirates and smugglers. During the course of repairs carried out in the early 19th Century, the removal of a massive oak beam revealed a perfect nest of ingeniously contrived hiding places probably used for the storage of stolen goods and contraband.

Enlarge Comment