Lewes (2) Location map
 
  Scene showing the 15th Century Book Shop, High Street, Lewes, Sussex, England   Lewes.

This 15th century timber-framed building on the corner of High Street and Keere Street is but one of a number of such buildings in Lewes.

Note the rather interesting construction which looks as though the original building may have been comprised of a number of seperate premises.

 

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  Keere Street, Lewes, Sussex, England   Lewes.

Walking down Keere Street will soon bring you to Southover Grange Garden. This view is looking towards the town centre on the hill with the castle keep showing on the skyline. This delightful garden, dating from 1572, is now run as a public park and is normally open from dawn till dusk. We saw what is purported to be one of the oldest Mulberry trees in England at around 350 years old.

Refreshments are available during the summer from a tea kiosk.

 

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  The 14th century castle, Lewes, Sussex, England   Lewes.

Another 15th century timber-framed house is Anne of Cleeves House in Southover which is open to the public except on Fridays and Saturdays during the high season.

 

 

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  The Downs, Lewes, Sussex, England   Lewes.

Lewes Priory was founded around 1080 on the site of a Saxon church dedicated, like the Priory, to St. Pancras. Lewes was the first Priory in England belonging to the reformed Benedictine Order of Cluny, based in France and became one of the wealthiest monasteries in England. The monastery was finally dissolved in 1537.

Dominating the site was the great 432 feet church which was larger than Chichester Cathedral and in 1845 excavations for the new railway between Lewes and Brighton destroyed much of what remained of the great church.

 

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  The Downs, Lewes, Sussex, England   Lewes.

Follow High Street downhill to the river and you will find yourself in the area know as Cliffe now a mainly pedestrian precinct with the high ground of the downs just beyond.

There are plenty of places to eat down here together with assorted other shops and the narrowest twitten in the town - English's Passage.

The slight hump in the road in the mid distance is the bridge over the river.

 

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