Lyme Regis (5), Dorset
 
Guildhall, Church Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England, Great Britain
Lyme Regis, Dorset.

The unusual guildhall showing the main entrance. The guildhall is said to date from Elizabethan times although the main part of the building dates from 1887. The Guildhall is actually in Bridge Street which is an extension of Church Street. Church Street starts at the far end of the Guildhall.

Comment  


 
Bridge Street and Church Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England, Great Britain
Lyme Regis, Dorset.

By the guildhall and the Tourist Information Centre is the junction of Bridge Street and Church Street. These two streets form a right-angle where they join making a very sharp bend in a narrow street which is rather tricky for bus drivers. These streets were never built for double-decker buses.

Comment  


 
Monmouth Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England, Great Britain
Lyme Regis, Dorset.

Monmouth Street leads from Coombe Street into Church Street and is just one of the narrow streets with colour-washed houses in Lyme Regis.

Comment  


 
Church Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England, Great Britain
Lyme Regis, Dorset.

Church Street has a number of rather nice colour-washed buildings and, naturally enough, it also includes the parish church of St. Michael the Archangel. It is the main route from Lyme Regis to Charmouth and Bridport.

Comment  


 
Church Street, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England, Great Britain
Lyme Regis, Dorset.

Church Street is very narrow in places and I even saw a sign warning traffic of overhanging buildings and the bay window for which this warning is intended can be seen further along on the left. That could be a potential problem for double decker buses.

Comment  


 
Church of St. Michael the Archangel, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England, Great Britain
Lyme Regis, Dorset.

The church of St. Michael the Archangel. There was a church here in Saxon times but it was mainly rebuilt in 1120. During extensive repairs to the tower in 1995 a late Saxon window was discovered and it is thought likely that the lower two thirds of the tower is Saxon. The church was also modified again in the 16th century.

When the church was first built it was a long way from the sea but after hundreds of years of erosion the cliffs are no more than 60 feet away now.

Comment